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Military Heroes Month: Keeping Heroes Close to Our Hearts

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Today, I am reflecting back upon the 2012 Military Heroes Month and Southwest’s commitment to our Troops, Veterans, and their families.  We have been privileged to share a glimpse into these heroes’ lives featured in the stories throughout the month on service, how we honor the Military, the sacrifices these heroes make, and how we celebrate the brave who fight for our Freedoms.   For most of us, turning a calendar page from November to December signifies that the holiday rush has begun, along with the countdown to the end of the year.  For our deployed Troops, Veterans, and their loved ones, the holidays are even more stressful when separation and sacrifice join to sharply point out the cost of their allegiance to our nation.  When duty called, they answered selflessly and reliably, and they serve for all of us, securing our Freedoms and the right to celebrate as we individually choose.   Let’s pledge to keep our Heroes and their families close in our hearts and faithfully do our part to support them, not only in November, but all through the year.

Several members of the Nuts About Southwest Blog Team shared with us who their Military hero is in their life and why, and we ask you to do the same by commenting below.

Krista Crow

My family has lots of ex military men. My husband and 2 Uncles were in the Navy, my father was a Marine, and my Grandfather was in the Army. I have always been proud of this, but my military hero is not one of these men. My military hero is not even in the military… yet.

My nephew, Josh, is a senior in high school and has decided to join the military. He currently plans to join the Air Force when he graduates.  I couldn’t be prouder of him for making this decision. Joining the military and being away from home is never easy, but with the things as they are now, it is a huge commitment to make to defend our country. My brother and his wife support his decision as well, which is also a hard thing for parents to do right now. It is what he has always wanted to do, to jump start a career in law enforcement after he completes his 4 years. The whole family couldn’t be happier for him.

Krista's Nephew

So for Josh and all the seniors who join the service and go out into the world and defend our great country, I can only say- Sincerely from the bottom of my heart, Thank You. You make all of us so very proud.

Aaron Hay

My Grandpa, Melvin “Mel” Tyborski, Korean War veteran, passed away this year on Memorial Day at 81 years.  He was awarded a bronze star for his heroism while defending South Korea against the Communist invaders from the North.

After his service to our country, he continued his patriotism by being involved in a great number of activities including his assistance in welcoming home Desert Storm troops at Milwaukee’s General Mitchel International Airport (MKE).  He was a true promoter of patriotism.  Growing up, I remember he always wore his bronze star hat when he came to visit.   I remember a few stories about his involvement in the Milwaukee community where he continued to promote the love for our country.

Aaron's Gpa

We all get caught up in the holiday rush.  It’s very easy to forget our freedoms during this time.  I’m grateful for my Grandpa, Veterans, Troops and their heroic actions and sacrifices so that we may continue to enjoy our freedoms.

Whitney Bartels

I often wonder if my generation truly understands the meaning of freedom. I may never have to fight for my freedom firsthand, but I will always hold a reverence for those that have served our country. My grandfather is a World War II Veteran and he serves as a constant reminder that my freedom came at a price. The war may have ended over 60 years ago, but the stories of his time in the war live on in our family- stories that resonate with me still today. I am thankful and honored to have a grandfather who has taught me not only the meaning of freedom, but sacrifice, honor, and pride. And I know that long after he is gone, we will still be telling his stories, and will always remember the price he and many others paid for our freedom.

Whitney's Grandpa

Brian Lusk

My dad served in both the US Navy and the Army Air Force during World War II.  Seems he got moved to the Air Force to meet a need for pilots.  He wound up as an aircraft commander on a B-17, and the war ended before he could ship out to the Eighth Air Force in England.  From Dad, I got my love of aviation.

My mom’s father served with the Texas National Guard in World War I in France, and she has his scrapbook, which is filled with stories first from training camp in Texas and then from Europe.  We learned that he first landed in France in the Brittany region with his unit at Dinard and then spent some time at nearby St. Malo.  His book is full of recollections from this period, but as he moved to the front, northeast of Paris, for the final battles of the war, his entries cease as he came next to the horror and reality of modern warfare.

It was the first and maybe the last time he ever left Texas.  My grandfather died when I was a baby, so I never knew him, but Mom tells me he never spoke about his time in France.  That’s why the scrapbook is so precious to our family.  I can only imagine what he thought when the men my mom and her sister would marry joined the military.  I am so proud of my Dad and Grandfather, who faced hardship and danger, for their service to the country.  


Brooks Thomas

As a youngster, I had little regard for history, or the stories about World War II my Grandfather would regale me with.
 
What I do remember was that he was a navigator on a B-17.  While the details and intricacies of his stories are faint, it’s not lost on me that he regularly put himself in harm’s way to protect many of the Freedoms I enjoy today.
 
It seems inauthentic to romanticize stories I can’t even recall, and I have a hard time putting into words my admiration for my Grandfather.
 
I didn’t know him well.  He died while I was young.  But he was a good and brave man, and undoubtedly a hero to many.

As a youngster, I had little regard for history, or the stories about World War II my Grandfather would regale me with.  What I do remember was that he was a navigator on a B-17. 

 
While the details and intricacies of his stories are faint, it’s not lost on me that he regularly put himself in harm’s way to protect many of the Freedoms I enjoy today.  It seems inauthentic to romanticize stories I can’t even recall, and I have a hard time putting into words my admiration for my Grandfather.

I didn’t know him well.  
 
He died while I was young.  
 
I do know this — he was a good and brave man, and undoubtedly a hero to many.